About the European Union

The EU is a unique economic and political partnership between 28 European countries that together cover much of the continent.

From Economic to Political Union

What began as a purely economic union has evolved into organization spanning policy areas, from development aid to environment.  The EU is based on the rule of law: everything that it does is founded on treaties, voluntarily and democratically agreed by all member countries. These binding agreements set out the EU's goals in its many areas of activity.

Human rights and equality

One of the EU’s main goals is to promote human rights both internally and around the world. Human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights: these are the core values of the EU. Since the 2009 signing of the Treaty of Lisbon, the EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights brings all these rights together in a single document. The EU's institutions are legally bound to uphold them, as are EU governments whenever they apply EU law.

Transparent and democratic institutions

As it continues to grow, the EU remains focused on making its governing institutions more transparent and democratic. More powers are being given to the directly elected European Parliament, while national parliaments are being given a greater role, working alongside the European institutions. In turn, European citizens have an ever-increasing number of channels for taking part in the political process.

EU response to the Syrian Crisis

With the announcement on 7 June by the President of the European Commission Jose Manuel Barroso of an additional €400 million, the European Union and its Member States have so far identified more than €1.269 billion in response to the crisis in Syria and its spill-over into neighbouring countries – more than € 840 million through the various instruments of the European Commission and more than €429 million from EU Member States. While the bulk of the funds are committed to humanitarian interventions inside Syria, an increasing amount is going to alleviate the pressures in neighbouring countries, in particular Lebanon and Jordan.


With the announcement on 7 June by the President of the European Commission Jose Manuel Barroso of an additional €400 million, the European Union and its Member States have so far identified more than €1.269 billion in response to the crisis in Syria and its spill-over into neighbouring countries – more than € 840 million through the various instruments of the European Commission and more than €429 million from EU Member States. While the bulk of the funds are committed to humanitarian interventions inside Syria, an increasing amount is going to alleviate the pressures in neighbouring countries, in particular Lebanon and Jordan.

With the announcement on 7 June by the President of the European Commission Jose Manuel Barroso of an additional €400 million, the European Union and its Member States have so far identified more than €1.269 billion in response to the crisis in Syria and its spill-over into neighbouring countries – more than € 840 million through the various instruments of the European Commission and more than €429 million from EU Member States. While the bulk of the funds are committed to humanitarian interventions inside Syria, an increasing amount is going to alleviate the pressures in neighbouring countries, in particular Lebanon and Jordan.With the announcement on 7 June by the President of the European Commission Jose Manuel Barroso of an additional €400 million, the European Union and its Member States have so far identified more than €1.269 billion in response to the crisis in Syria and its spill-over into neighbouring countries – more than € 840 million through the various instruments of the European Commission and more than €429 million from EU Member States. While the bulk of the funds are committed to humanitarian interventions inside Syria, an increasing amount is going to alleviate the pressures in neighbouring countries, in particular Lebanon and Jordan.

The EU in the world

The European Union (EU) is represented in Lebanon by the EU Delegation, one of over 136 EU Delegations around the world. The EU is composed of 28 individual Member Statesand the EU Delegation in Lebanon works closely with all of the 24 Member States that are accredited to Lebanon.

Following the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty on 1 December 2009 and under High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policyand Vice-President of the European Commission, Catherine Ashton, the EU has set up a unified diplomatic service called the European External Action Service (EEAS). EU Delegations are part of the EEAS. The EU Delegation now represents the EU as a whole, with the Head of Delegation or Ambassador accredited as the official representative of the EU.

The EU Delegation functions much like an Embassy and represents the EU in its dealings with political issues, trade, development, cooperation, etc. Consular protection of EU citizensis provided by individual Member States Embassies and their Consulates. 

Through its engagement with political actors, the media, academics, business circles, civil society and citizens, the EU Delegation raises awareness of EU issues and concerns, and promotes the importance of the EU-Lebanon partnership among the Lebanese authorities and the broader Lebanese public. On the political level, the EU supports an independent, sovereign, unified and stable Lebanon, and encourages Lebanon to fulfil its international obligations and to implement an ambitious agenda of political, economic and social reforms.

To learn more about the role of the EU Delegation to Lebanon:

http://eeas.europa.eu/index_en.htm  
http://europa.eu/index_en.htm